PRESS RELEASE: Beethoven Explored Concert Series

What Makes a Musical Genius?

LMP on the Move Concert Series wins at Croydon Business Awards

We’re thrilled and delighted to have been awarded the Cultural Impact Award at Croydon Business Excellence Awards for our ‘LMP on the Move’ series. This new award, sponsored by the Rise Gallery, reflects our commitment to widen audiences for classical music – particularly among young people and non-traditional classical audiences.

Through the LMP on the Move series we have been able to develop new partnerships and discover new venues for classical music in Croydon and this has enabled us to reinvigorate awareness of the LMP within Croydon (while the Fairfield Halls undergoes a facelift) and attract an audience that really reflects all the borough’s communities.

We have been on an amazing journey, met and played with some fantastic young musicians and even surprised ourselves with the diversity of venues, audience and music. This award really is the icing on the cake. Huge thanks to our partners and collaborators and of course to our supporters and audiences!

Arts Council England | Croydon Council | Regent Land & Development | Centronic | Croydon Music & Arts | Coulsdon College | St Nicholas School | Matthews Yard | Rooftop Cinema/Lost Format Society | Croydon Libraries | Boxpark Croydon | St John’s, Upper Norwood | Fiona Brice | Ben Palmer | Paul Patterson | Rebecca Kenny| Sheku Kanneh-Mason | Shift K3Y

Celebrating the launch of Compassionate Neighbours in South East London

Join us on Saturday 21 October 1.30-3.30pm at Christ Church Gipsy Hill, 1 Highland Road SE19 1DP for an celebratory afternoon consisting of:

• Afternoon tea
• Art activities and exhibition
• Live music including the London Mozart Players

It’s FREE – everyone’s welcome!
What is Compassionate Neighbours? It’s a growing network of trained volunteers offering their time, companionship and support to people around them living with a chronic or terminal illness or experiencing loneliness or social isolation. For more information contact Steph Turner, Community Participation Lead, at CN@stchristophers.org.uk or 07867 556472.

Join us in the evening as well for our launch concert at St John’s in association with St Christopher’s Hospice and Compassionate Neighbours.

New Release! Mozart Requiem on Convivium Records

Our brand new recording of Mozart’s Requiem with Malcolm Archer and Winchester College Chapel Choir has been released today! Recorded back in Summer 2016 in Winchester College’s stunning New Hall, we’re delighted with the final product, and sure you will be impressed too.

 

‘A cornerstone of choral repertoire, Mozart’s Requiem has been performed and recorded by many leading artists. This performance conducted by Malcolm Archer with Winchester College Chapel Choir, London Mozart Players, and soloists Sarah Fox, Diana Moore, John Mark Ainsley & Ashley Riches delivers a compelling performance: combining the thrilling clarity of Winchester College choir, a star studded line up of soloists and the integrity of the countries longest established orchestra in Süssmayr’s completion of the work.’

 

A new Piano Explored Series at St John’s Smith Square

We’re absolutely delighted to be returning to St John’s Smith Square alongside Howard Shelley for a new 5 concert lunchtime series, Piano Explored. For 17/18, audiences will uncover the anguish of Shostakovich, reminisce on a classic love story that spiralled Schumann to global success, delve into the grandeur of Mendelssohn, whisk through Saint-Saens’ rollercoaster-esque creative process and dive into the explosive mind of Grieg.

Described by International Piano as “The best lunch-break you’ve ever had,” this popular series will see a host of symphonic performances, accompanied as ever by Howard’s humorous and intriguing introductions, all within a lunchtime concert in the beautiful surroundings of St John’s Smith Square.

Designed for everyone from city workers and resident Londoners to holiday-makers day-trippers, London Mozart Players’ Piano Explored is the perfect addition to your lunch-time.

TICKETS NOW ON SALE! Click on the dates below to book your tickets.

Tickets: £15 (students £5)

Wednesday 4th October 2017 – 1.05pm
GRIEG Piano Concerto in A minor Op.16

Wednesday 1st November 2017 – 1.05pm
SCHUMANN Piano Concerto A minor Op.54

Wednesday 6th December 2017 – 1.05pm
SHOSTAKOVICH Piano Concerto No.2 in F, Op.102

Wednesday 7th February 2018 – 1.05pm
MENDELSSOHN Piano Concerto No.1 in G minor, Op.25

Wednesday 7th March 2018 – 1.05pm
SAINT-SAËNS Piano Concerto No.2 in G minor, Op.22

 

Box Office: 020 7222 1061 | St John’s Smith Square, London, SW1P 3HA
Booking fees: £2.75 telephone / £1.75 online

 

10 things you might not know about Roald Dahl…

In preparation for our special family concert performance of Roald Dahl’s ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ on Sunday 18 June for the Crystal Palace Overground Festival, I thought I’d put together this little list of facts about Roald Dahl that you might not know!

Along with my trusty young ambassador Sarah Posner – and a little help from www.roalddahl.com! – we came up with this smashing list unveiling the fascinating man behind some of the world’s most loved children’s books.

At a first glance it would seem that Roald Dahl was just a big kid at heart, as this is prevalent throughout his writing. What also permeates his work is a perpetual sense of wonder, adventure, and at times peril, and this can only be drawn from his eventful and exciting life!

Did you know…?

1. Roald Dahl was an RAF fighter pilot in World War II – he earned himself the nickname ‘Lofty’, due to his height (he was well over 6 ft, which was unusual for a pilot)

2. His lexical talents also extended to writing screenplays – such features include ‘Chitty Chitty Bang Bang’ and the James Bond classic, ‘You Only Live Twice’

3. He wrote all his children’s stories in a small hut in the bottom of his garden – everyone needs a space for their imagination to run wild!

4. Roald Dahl was a chocolate taster at school – Dahl attended Repton boarding school, where this prominent memory inspired the tale of Charlie Bucket and Willie Wonka’s Chocolate Factory

5. Roald Dahl was a medical innovator – he contributed significantly to the invention of the modern ventricular catheter

6. He published a cookbook with his second wife Liccy (Felicity) – not limited to fictional tales, Dahl and his wife also put together a book of beloved recipes gathered across their years together

7. He invented more than 250 words and character names – Such treasures include scrumdiddlyumptious and frizzlecrump, and there is even an Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary! Take that GCSE English!

8. Dahl often based his characters on people he knew himself – For example, the grandma in The Witches was based on his mother, Sofie. I’d hate to think who the Twits were based on…

9. The Roald Dahl Children’s Gallery was opened at the Buckinghamshire County Museum in 1996 – full of hands on experiences and activities, there is much to discover here

10. Roald Dahl was a spy! – During WWII he passed intelligence to MI6 from Washington

Many who are familiar with Dahl’s literary works will note his use of dark humour and regular plotlines of children overcoming great adversaries, often at the hands of adults. In his championing of youth, the power of imagination and creativity, his stories have endured for decades and will continue to delight parents and children alike for many generations to come.

LMP are delighted to be part of this legacy, through Paul Patterson’s musical account of Roald Dahl’s retelling of ‘Little Red Riding Hood’. Told with wit and the unpatronizing humour characteristic of its author, and the forces of a wind quintet (flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon & horn), piano and narrator, this lively and tuneful rendition of the fairy tale classic will appeal to all the family.

By Jenny Brady

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Jenny Brady is the Creative Learning & Participation Manager at London Mozart Players.

You can buy tickets for LMP’s performance of Little Red Riding Hood via this link.

‘Relationships’ at Matthews Yard review

Event review: the London Mozart Players in Fiona Brice’s ‘Relationships’ at Matthews Yard, Friday 19th May


By – Wednesday 24th May, 2017

Orchestral manoeuvres in Matthews Yard

The launch night of #LMPOnTheMove at Matthews Yard once again embodied this vision of taking the power of classical music into the community to uplift, inspire and engage new audiences. The main space of Matthews Yard had been cleared to accommodate a chamber version of the orchestra, and the audience paid just £8.00 each to reserve a seat, receive a free beer and/or give a donation. This was classical music set right in the middle of Friday night in Croydon, with the hum of conversation and the deep fat fryer of BRGR&Beer hissing away in the background. As the shadows of their bows flickered across the stripped-back walls in a dynamic dance of musical light and shade, this was clearly Matthews Yard as we’d never quite seen or heard it before.One of the unexpected and wonderful outcomes of the closure of Fairfield Halls is the relocation of the London Mozart Players (LMP) to St John the Evangelist church, Upper Norwood. The longest-established chamber orchestra in the UK, formed in 1949 by conductor Harry Blech, LMP has been resident at Fairfield Halls since 1989. Executive director Julia Desbruslais described the move to St John the Evangelist as “a pivotal point in the long history of LMP”, making it ‘the first orchestra in this country to embed itself into the very heart of a living, breathing community’ with a vision “to build, connect and resonate with the people here”. Since the move in July 2016, LMP has done just that with a series of imaginative, interactive, inclusive concerts and projects with local schools, colleges, community choirs and intergenerational audiences.

It was absolutely fitting that the theme and title piece of the event was ‘Relationships’, as LMP launches a series of events which forge new relationships across the borough. The evening’s programme featured three pieces which each offered a unique reflection on relationships.

Photo by the London Mozart Players, used with permission.

Shostakovich’s Symphony for Chamber Orchestra was originally composed in only three days as String Quartet No 8. in 1960, when he had begun to experience symptoms of motor neurone disease and was contemplating suicide. In a letter to his friend Isaak Glickman, he wrote: “When I die, it’s hardly likely that someone will write a quartet dedicated to my memory. So I decided to write it to myself”. It was later intimated in his memoirs that the dedication in the score to ‘victims of fascism and the war’ was dictated by Soviet authorities and that the piece was really an epitaph. It opens with his musical signature, the DSCH motif, and references many of his other pieces and a Russian revolutionary song, ‘Tormented by Grievous Bondage’. The piece was transcribed for chamber orchestra by his friend, violist and conductor Rudolf Barshai.

We travelled the vast emotional landscapes of despair and destruction

LMP’s powerful rendering of this profound work took the listener into reflection on the deepest, darkest spaces of humanity. Artwork from students at Coulsdon College poignantly pointed to the relationship between the inner battles of the psyche and outward conflicts and war. With the mastery of expert voyagers, LMP guided us through the vast emotional landscapes of the individual and collective struggle with despair and destruction.

Hauntingly long notes were sustained against the furious thrumming of their bows, suggested the beating of a human being against the walls of their own pain and the walls of oppression. Music critic Erik Smith said that Shostokovich wept on hearing the “beautiful realisation of his most personal feelings” when the Borodin Quartet performed the piece to him at his Moscow home. I’m sure he would have been as moved as we were that night.

We felt the vibrant relevance of classical music in today’s world

Fiona Brice, composer of the evening’s title piece, reflected on the relationship between the composer and orchestra in her contemplative introduction to the evening’s programme. She described the role of the composer as transcribing emotions into a form which can then be expressed by the orchestra. The relationship between her and LMP was one of trust, she affirmed, before they embarked on the world premiere of her piece, ‘Relationships’, which was written after a relationship break-up. LMP adeptly articulated the full spectrum of feelings in the piece, from tender moments of loss to sudden upward surges of positivity.

As Fiona said, these feelings are not limited only to relationship break-up but to the human condition. An orchestrator for artists including Placebo, Sandy Dillon and Kate Nash and violinist who has performed with Kanye West, Beyonce and Jay-Z, her headlining of this programme demonstrates the LMP’s intention to underline the vibrant relevancy of classical music in today’s world.

The final piece of the evening drew us into yet another layer of relationships – that between composer and composer. Ástor Piazzolla’s The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires, based on Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, is an intoxicating dance between an Argentinian composer writing in 1969 and an Italian composer writing in 1721.  Originally written for Piazzolla’s first Quinteto of violin, piano, electric guitar, double bass and bandoneon, the pieces were arranged for solo violin and strings by Leonid Desyatnikov. The fireworks of Piazolla’s Tango Nuevo caused real-life furore amongst classical musical traditionalists – fights broke out at performances of his works and he received death threats.

These players exploded the stiff, starchy stereotypes of the traditional orchestra

Fortunately, the audience at Matthews Yard was far more appreciative! We were drawn into a time travel tango where bursts of Vivaldi rang out amidst the fury, passion, heat and amore of Buenos Aires tango. LMP leader and soloist Ruth Rogers led us deftly through this vivacious, vibrant encounter with her flamboyant, expressive performance.

The dynamic relationship between LMP’s players is a compelling dance to witness. Their passion and commitment to playing right in the thick of things explodes the stiff, starchy stereotypical images of a classical orchestra. Julia Desbruslais’s affirmation that they “absolutely love playing together” is evident in every note.  Their elaborate musical conversation bounces from bow to bow playfully, delicately, precisely, furiously. We were all on our feet cheering at the end of this magical performance which connected players, composers, listeners and the wider community in promising new relationships.


#LMPOntheMove now goes on creating new relationships across the borough at events including the sound track to Charlie Chaplin’s ‘The Gold Rush’ at RoofTop Cinema, (to be reviewed in the Citizen shortly) and an expansive future programme. For more information, click here.

Inaugural #LMPOnTheMove launches in Croydon

London Mozart Players are delighted  to announce the launch of their new tour series #LMPOnTheMove, running May-July 2017.

Featuring 5 specially-curated musical experiences, the ensemble aims to take orchestral-music making to new audiences across the South London community, and in the process reach people of all ages, backgrounds and musical interests. The series includes some of the biggest collaborators across chart, electronic and classical music, including multi-platinum selling recording artist & DJ Shift K3y and BBC Young Musician 2016 Sheku Kanneh-Mason.

o The orchestra kicks off their tour with Placebo & Kanye West collaborator FIONA BRICE at Matthews Yard on Friday 19 May, performing the world premiere of her new string work ‘Relationships’, as well as music from Shostakovich & Piazzolla

o The following day (Saturday 20 May) sees a collaboration with Lost Format Society – Croydon’s only rooftop cinema and bar experience – to perform Charlie Chaplin’s Academy-Award® nominated score for silent comedy The Gold Rush, live to picture

o Half-term brings an opportunity to enjoy a performance of Paul Patterson’s arrangement of Roald Dahl’s ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ with your family, narrated by Rebecca Kenny and performed at Croydon’s Central Children’s Library. There will be an arts and crafts workshop running an hour before each performance, which will take place at 10:45am and 2:45pm

o BBC Young Musician 2016 Sheku Kanneh-Mason performs Haydn’s Cello Concerto with the orchestra in the highlight of a weekend takeover for Crystal Palace Overground Festival at our home at St John the Evangelist, Upper Norwood

Their new, dynamic tour series sees the orchestra adopt an exciting mixed-funding model which includes funding from Arts Council England – our first award from the national body in four years – and Croydon Council, as well as a host of financial and in-kind support from local companies. Ever conscious of the need for a broad range of income streams, the ensemble has developed relationships with many of the established businesses in the area including developer Regent Land – a leading member of Develop Croydon, a CIC forum promoting the regeneration of the area – and 70 year old electronics manufacturer Centronic employ over 120 people across Croydon.

The orchestra’s reputation for adventurous, ambitious programming is alive and kicking with five distinctive programmes of music. Genre-crossing composer and violinist Fiona Brice DJs the tour’s opening night in a vibrant programme spanning Shostakovich, Piazzolla and her new experimental orchestral work ‘Relationships’. The following night the ensemble is joined by conductor Ben Palmer, as they take to Centrale Shopping Centre’s rooftop car park to perform Charlie Chaplin’s Academy Award®-nominated score for his silent comedy The Gold Rush; the sunset screening is one of the Lost Format Society’s highlights of their annual rooftop cinema and bar experience.

We have definitely made sure there’s something for all age groups; June kicks off with two performances of Paul Patterson’s musical arrangement of Roald Dahl’s ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ which makes for a must-see for families during the half term; the orchestra’s partnership with Carillion and Croydon’s Central Library includes a pre-performance arts and crafts workshop where the children can make their own masks for the story, whilst the set design has been facilitated by the local St. Nicholas’ School for special education needs.

The same month, the orchestra presents a musical takeover at their home in Upper Norwood as part of the 2017 Crystal Palace Overground Festival, including a special one-off performance by BBC Young Musician 2016 Sheku Kanneh-Mason, who will play Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C, with London Mozart Players also playing side by side with musicians from the local Music Education Hub Croydon Music & Arts in a performance of Shostakovich’s ‘Chamber Symphony’.

The orchestra’s tour culminates with a collaboration with multi-platinum selling recording artist Shift K3y, who headlines a fusion night of electronic, indie and classical music at Croydon’s new 2,000 capacity Box Park. The producer will play brand new material alongside the ensemble, which will also perform with resident producer GRADES and emerging South London talent George Cosby.

Julia Desbruslais, Executive Director of the orchestra, said:

“London Mozart Players are thrilled to be delivering our new exciting series #LMPOnTheMove. We hope these collaborative performances in exciting, diverse venues will appeal to audiences of all ages and experiences, taking place right on the doorsteps of residents, within our home of the Borough of Croydon. These flagship events will go towards putting Croydon on the map artistically as a creative and innovative hub of musical and artistic excellence.”

Paula Murray, Croydon Council’s Cultural Director, said:
“We are delighted to be supporting this excellent new series by London Mozart Players, taking classical music to audiences and venues across the borough. With Fairfield Halls closed for its refurbishment, it’s vital that we continue to support fantastic cultural initiatives like this one, as well as developing unforgettable collaborations with world-class musical talent from other genres. On the Move both physically and artistically!”

#LMPOnTheMove runs May – July, starting at Matthews Yard on 19th May with Fiona Brice. Tickets are available on Eventbrite now here.

David Angel (1954-2017)

The London Mozart Players is deeply shocked and saddened by the sudden death of David Angel, our beloved colleague and friend, co-principal 2nd violinist with the LMP for the past 22 years.

He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, energy, musical integrity, consummate musical knowledge, all mixed up with a wonderful sense of humour that could lift any situation. All who came into contact with David were touched by his gentleness, generosity and humility as a human being. He is a massive loss to the world of classical music and 100% irreplaceable as a musician and personality within the LMP.

He will be sadly missed, and our thoughts are with his family at this difficult time. David’s family have asked for donations in lieu of flowers to the Alzheimer’s Society.

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David Angel was a founder pupil of the Yehudi Menuhin School, where he studied with Yehudi Menuhin, Frederick Grinke, Jacqueline Salomons and Nadia Boulanger. In 1971 he won an Associated Board Scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music, continuing his studies with Frederick Grinke and receiving chamber music coaching from Sidney Griller, winning prizes for both solo and chamber music. He was a co-founder of the Maggini Quartet in 1988.

David’s solo playing received great acclaim, winning high praise in The Times for performances of Bach’s Chaconne and E major Concerto with the London Contemporary Dance, and in the Financial Times in 1988 for a performance at the Almeida Festival. He played Autumn from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons on many occasions, notably at the Barbican with the London Mozart Players, and was a soloist with London Musici.

Co-principal of the second violin section of the London Mozart Players, he led the second violins of many top London chamber orchestras, including the London Chamber Orchestra, London Musici, Orchestra of St. John’s and Sinfonia 21.

David was an ARAM and in demand as a teacher and chamber music coach; in autumn 1993 he was appointed Professor of quartet playing at Birmingham Conservatoire, and he was also an Honorary Fellow of Canterbury Christ Church University College and Brunel University.

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